The research of climate-ice interaction focuses on mountain glaciers in Chile and Norway. Mountain glaciers not only shape the landscape via glacial erosion, but also serve as a water reservoir for local communities, and as a renewable energy source. A better understanding of climate-glacier interactions therefore benefits different scientific communities, as well as policy makers.

Fig. 1 Preparing for ice front measurements at Tunsbergdalsbreen glacier at the end of the ablation season.

In Norway, for example, melt water flow contributes ca. 15% to the hydroelectric power generation, which makes up more than 95% of the total power production in the country. In the example for climate-ice interaction research below, you see the predicted mass balance changes for several Norwegian mountain glaciers: Ålfotbreen (Ålf), Austdalsbreen (Aus), Engabreen (Eng), Gråsubreen(Grå), Hansebreen (Han), Hardangerjøkelen (Har), Hellstugubreen (Hel), Langfjordjøkelen (Lan), Nigardsbreen (Nig), Storbreen (Sto).

Fig. 2 Total mass loss/gain by the end of 2100 based on empirical models for different Norwegian glaciers and emission scenarios: Ålfotbreen (Ålf), Austdalsbreen (Aus), Engabreen (Eng), Gråsubreen(Grå), Hansebreen (Han), Hardangerjøkelen (Har), Hellstugubreen (Hel), Langfjordjøkelen (Lan), Nigardsbreen (Nig), Storbreen (Sto), c.f. Mutz et al., 2015.